Learn All About Adult And Children ADHD

ADHD
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One of the things people with Adult ADHD symptoms really struggle with is procrastination. And procrastination really comes out of fear. What kind of fear?

There are two main fears people with Adult ADHD symptoms face when they try to start a big project.

  • How do I know I’m choosing the right thing to work on?
  • How do I know I won’t fail, especially if I don’t know anything about this yet?

First of all, you’ve got to ask yourself, “What am I so afraid of?” Let’s just bring it out into the open. If I pick an opportunity, the fear becomes, “Oh, my gosh. What am I going to miss?”

Just the way it works

The truth is, the second someone with Adult ADHD focuses on something, you’re missing a lot of other things. That’s just the way it works.

It’s not about the opportunity. It’s not about which Internet-type thing you should be doing. It’s “why.” You’ve got to ask yourself, “How would this particular opportunity fit in with my larger vision?”

Some people with Adult ADHD might not feel like they know exactly what they want to do with their whole lives. And this is where a lot of fear about choosing what to do next comes from.

Well, you know what? Whatever you want to do with your life right now, it probably is going to change at some point (especially if you have Adult ADHD). Just because you’re going full tilt on something right now doesn’t mean you have to do that for the rest of your life.

 

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/ca/8c/b6/ca8cb6612b00a065a522ae6bbb3eab1c.jpg

 

It does mean that, if you’re going to spend your time doing something, it should be something you’re incredibly passionate about to begin with, something that you’d like to spend all your time on anyway.

Most likely, if you have Adult ADHD symptoms, you’ll find yourself in the exact same situation at some point in the future. It happens. You work really hard. You go full speed at something, and occasionally, you look up and you say, “What the heck am I doing?”

That’s ok. At that point, if you really want to, you can shift your focus. No one’s stopping you. But don’t let that fear stop you from starting.

The second fear those with Adult ADHD symptoms feel has to do with how much there is to learn about a subject or skill, and the information overload that occurs so often with Adult ADHD.

It’s an entire industry

My experience was, I said, “I’m going to learn this Internet thing. I’m going to go out and I’m going to learn everything that I possibly can,” and I didn’t realize at the very beginning that there were so many different subspecialties. It’s an entire industry.

You could be a specialist in list building, in search engine optimization, in advertising or all these different subspecialties, and you realize that what you’re trying to do is go out and learn an entire industry. Of course, it doesn’t really work that way.

You don’t go out one day and say, “Okay, I’m going to be a lawyer,” and understand every aspect of law. Even lawyers have to pick a specialty, be it corporate, criminal, bankruptcy or whatever. You don’t say, “I’m going to go out and learn everything there is to know about foreign language,” right? You pick one.

So, if that is true, that brings up another question for people with Adult ADHD symptoms: “What sub-specialty do I pick then? I have to pick one.”

 

 

Again, we’re teaching you ways to think with your Adult ADHD brain instead of against it here. As you’re thinking about the anxiety of having to pick one area of specialty, for example, to grow your business or to work on in your life, remember that people with Adult ADHD symptoms have something that they use automatically every day they don’t usually appreciate, and that is a very highly-developed intuition.

Intuition is why people with Adult ADHD make snap decisions all the time. You’re really good at it naturally. It’s coming from your gut.

Clear your head

But you need a clear head to do it. So if you’ve got information overload, and you can’t decide to focus on one thing, how do you clear your head?

What you need to do is this: You need to go on an “unsubscribe” campaign! Start with the information you have coming in on your computer every day.
You should continue subscribing to or buying the information from the people that you intuitively know are going to help you with your one main focus. But clear out the rest, so you don’t even see it.

Let your computer sort it so your head doesn’t have to.

Do this with other things in your life too. Once you decide what you’re main focus is (at least for now)–then “unsubscribe” or disconnect from anything, and anyone, that doesn’t contribute to that one goal.

ADHD Article Help Guide

One of the best things about the Internet and about serious, scholarly, and devoted professional help sites is being able to find the accurate, timely, and truly informative articles related to your search. The ADHD article is among such benefits.

While we can find astoundingly apt materials in the bookstore on ADHD (Attention Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder), such as Kate Kelly and Peggy Ramundos lifesaving book, or those equally useful works by Thom Hartmann, Shari Holden, and others, the ADHD article is quicker, more easily accessible (online, I mean), and is just as valuable as written by an ADHD specialist, expert, and/or professional.

You can start with the ADHD site or ADHD ezine (online magazine), for example to find almost any ADHD article as it is relevant to you and yours:

*BTE, borntoexplore.org, offers information and a number of helpful, informative ADHD articles for scholarship and personal use.

*ADDitude magazine is online and by subscription, and has so many practical and realistic ADHD articles for the professional, the student, the parent, and the adult that you will definitely want your own copy! I came by the magazine through the college where I worked, and since then has read every magazine issue cover to cover. I then had to subscribe to resist the sinful temptation of keeping the copies I borrowed.

 

ADHD Strengths and Talents (although I'm not entirely sure about working well under pressure all the time!! ;)

 

You will also want to check out the ADHD article databases:

*The absolute premier site for ADHD articles is ADD Consults (addconsults.com). It will take you a little time to figure out how the system is constructed, but once you decide on a subject area, or sub-topic, you will get ADHD articles on everything from ADD strategies to co-morbidity information to ADHD articles about children and adults with ADD.

The articles are upscale and professional, clinical, and/or personal, and are a must read! The site is built by Terry Matlin, MSW, ASCW, and features the astoundingly superbly brilliant support of ADHD article writers who are big names in the fieldEdward Hallowell, John J. Ratey, Sari Solden, Thom Hartmann, and Michelle Novotny, to name just a few!

The moment you find the source that is most user-friendly and helpful to you, go ahead and sign up for a free newsletter, one which offers an ADHD article or two weekly or monthly (whenever the newsletter is delivered to your inbox):

*Terry Matlin, ACSW, also offers a newsletter which features an ADHD article, book reviews, and blurbs on many ADHD aids/products for the ADHDer, as I call her or him (as I call myself).

*Breath and Shadow, a monthly (or thereabouts) newsletter put out by ROSC as the Journal of Literature and Disability Culture, is for writers and artists with any or all disabilities, and issues a monthly newsletter with a predetermined theme, but occasionally you might get an ADHD article.

You can find the most relevant, scholarly ADHD articles, or the most personal and still accurate ADHD article written by a non-credentialed individual who is or knows someone who has to put up with the frustrations and challenges as well as special and unique gifts of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, a.k.a ADD. Come on, any sites to share with me, anyone?

ADHD Treatments

ADHD stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and it is a chronic condition that can have a great impact on a child if a child does not get help, or if the right ADHD treatment is not prescribed.

Some of the most common symptoms of ADHD are impulsivity, inappropriate behavior, and hyperactivity. These children have difficulty staying on task and completing projects, which if not identified and treated early can be a huge barrier throughout the school years and eventually on the job.

Before there was a diagnosis, these children were just seen as having lots of energy, or were just wild and always getting into trouble. Now that ADHD treatments are available, parents have the option of getting their child help so that they can be more productive in school and have fewer disruptions at home.

Not all parents and professionals agree on what type of ADHD treatment is the best, or if it should be used at all. Some parents feel that it is unnatural to treat a child with prescription medication that could have significant side effects, or otherwise harm the child.

 

Side effects are dose dependent and can be lessened by reducing the dosage or switching to a different medication.

 

Side effects are dose dependent and can be lessened by reducing the dosage or switching to a different medication. Many times behavior modification therapy is not effective on its own, which is why ADHD treatment usually requires use of a stimulant drug.

Stimulants used in ADHD

Stimulants have a paradoxical effect on children; these drugs do not increase hyperactivity, which is a normal response in adults, but help the child focus, control behaviors, and improve self-esteem. Stimulants used in ADHD treatment help children to complete tasks, learn more efficiently, and interact more positively with their peers.

Physicians and psychiatrists develop individualized ADHD treatments for each child, because not all experience the same symptoms or have the same level of severity. There can also be other conditions that are present as well, such as mental or physical disorders that need to be addressed in addition to ADHD treatment.

Such conditions may have a great impact on how the child responds to therapy, and if not treated simultaneously will tend to slow down progress.

There are a number of sites on the internet that discuss ADHD, the symptoms, and how to go about getting help for your child. ADHD treatments and the controversies surrounding them are also discussed in depth. If you suspect your child has ADHD have him or her evaluated by a professional as soon as possible, so that your child can get the treatment he or she needs.


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